Plants for a Glorious Rosary Garden for Ascension and Pentecost

.

A month dedicated the Virgin Mary, the week of the Ascension and Pentecost?!

What better way to celebrate all three than to consider planting a rosary garden dedicated to the Glorious Mysteries?

In my book through Ave Maria Press,  A Catholic Gardener’s Spiritual Almanac , is offered the following suggestions for a summer full of blooms:

Glorious Mysteries

Resurrection of Our Lord; Faith: Easter lily, Lilium longiflorum; Resurrection plant, Selaginella lepidophylla, comes back to life even though it appears dead. It is more often grown indoors as an oddity or specimen plant. Also any of the delphiniums, Delphinium spp. symbolic of our salvation.

Ascension into Heaven; Hope: Lilac, ascension flower, Syringa vulgaris cvs.; Snowdrops, Galanthus spp, signify the consolation that comes to those who are filled with hope; the sweet almond tree, Prunus dulcis cvs., symbolizes hope, watchfulness, and promise.

Descent of the Holy Spirit; Zeal: Columbine, Aquilegia spp., has petals shaped like a dove (columba is Latin for dove); Pentecost rose, peony, Paeonia officinalis cvs.

Assumption of Mary; Happy Death : The assumption lily, Hosta plantaginea, in most regions blooms around mid-August—and the bonus is its fragrance is similar to Easter lilies; Belladonna lily, Amaryllis belladonna, whose name literally means “beautiful lady,” leafs out in spring, dies back, and then sends up single stalks of flowers in mid-August.

Coronation of Mary; Love of Mary: Cornflower, Centaurea spp., Mary’s crown; Yellow flag iris, Iris pseudacorus, Mary as queen (be careful, this plant becomes invasive in some regions).

The plants mentioned above are only a few options. You could also section off the rosary garden by using colors to signify each mystery.

Begin by using all white flowers at the first Glorious Mystery the Resurrection of Our Lord; blue flowers at the second mystery for the Ascension into Heaven. Of course red is traditional for the descent of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost which is the third mystery. For the forth Glorious Mystery of Mary’s Assumption into Heaven, yellow suggests her luminous love of God and Jesus. For the fifth mystery, the Coronation of Mary, grow bright orange flowers for her crown.

Select hardwoods, annuals or perennials suitable to your Hardiness Zone and soil type. By planning for growing the right plant in the right place you will have a garden you can enjoy, and pray with, for years.

Image by Hans Braxmeier from Pixabay .

Shroud of Turin and its Flowers

.

The Shroud of Turin was wrapped around the body of Jesus after it was taken down from the cross. Experts in the natural sciences began examining the shroud toward the end of the twentieth century. Botanical experts on the research team found the imprints of plants and grains of pollen that can serve as seasonal calendar and geographic indicators.

Four plants on the shroud are significant because, as researchers Danin and Baruch report, “…the assemblage…occurs in only one rather small spot on earth, this being the Judean mountains and the Judean Desert of Israel, in the vicinity of Jerusalem.”[1. Danin, et al. Flora of the Shroud of Turin, p. 18.]

Those experts succeeded in identifying thirty-six species of plants[2. More than thirty-six have been found on the shroud but await unequivocal species identification.] on the shroud. They discovered that almost all of the flower images remaining on the cloth and the highest concentration of pollens were where the head of the corpus would have been lying; plant parts and pollens were also located throughout the rest of the shroud. 

Plants Found on the Shroud of Turin:[3. Danin, et al. Flora of the Shroud of Turin, p. 12.]

Botanical Name

Common Name (English)

Anabasis aphylla

Anabasis

Acacia albida

Acacia

Artemisia herba-alba

White Wormwood

Atraphaxis spinosa

Atraphaxis

Capparis ovata

Caper

Carduus

Carduus Thistle

Cedrus libanoticus

Cedrus

Echinops glaberrimus

Echinops

Fagonia mollis

Fagonia

Gundelia tournefortii

Tumble Thistle

Haplophyllum tuberculatum

Haplophyllum

Hyoscyamus reticulatus

Henbane

Linum mucronatum

Armenian Flax

Paliurus spina-christi

Jerusalem Thorn, Garland Thorn, or Crown of Thorns

Prosopis farcta

Dwarf Mesquite, Syrian Mesquite

Reaumuria hirtella

Reaumuria

Ricinus communis

Castor Oil Plant

Scabiosa prolifera

Carmel Daisy

Scirpus

Scirpus

Secale

Rye

Suaeda

Seepweed

Tamarix

Salt Cedar

The botanists found several factors of particular interest to those studying, even doubting, the authenticity of the shroud. These are some of their findings: 

  1. All the plants are ones that grow in Israel. Of these, twenty are known to grow in Jerusalem itself and eight others grow in the vicinity in the Judean desert or the Dead Sea area. 
  2. Although some of these plants are found in Europe, fourteen plants grow only in the Middle East.
  3. Twenty-seven of the plants bloom in the springtime at the same time as the Jewish Passover. 
  4.  Zygophyllum dumosum, has both pollen as well as an image on the shroud and grows only in Israel, Jordan and the Sinai region. 
  5. Gundelia tournefortii (most frequent of the pollens found by the scientist on the shroud, and is indicative of season) was the plant material found where the Crown-of-Thorns was imprinted around the head on the cloth. 

________________________________

Danin, Avinoam, Whanger, Alan D., Baruch, Uri, Whanger, Mary. Flora of the Shroud of Turin. St. Louis, MO; Missouri Botanical Garden Press, 1999.

Image of Scabiosa prolifera by Hanay from Wikimedia

Intimate Prayers in a Garden

.

Gardening at home is a private thing; it’s when I look really bad and after a lot of it, smell even worse. It is something I have always done alone…for more than the obvious above-mentioned reasons. It feels similar to being in the Adoration chapel, and a time of intimate conversation with God. In the garden I feel as if I can touch Him, lay my hands upon His very skin. I find it to be a very personal and sensory connection with the Creator. I remember getting goose-bumps the first time I read this verse by Edna St. Vincent Millay, “God, I can push the grass apart and lay my finger on thy heart.” I still get all bubbly inside when I read it.

Working in the gardens at the retreat center with volunteers is different, like going to Mass; it is a public gathering as community. We present ourselves differently at church by our dress, interactions with one another, and our way of being present with God.

There is a willing vulnerability when praying alone with Our Lord, and like most private conversations, a freedom within that seclusion. I remember a close friend explaining his sense of being vulnerable when he married and knelt down to pray for the first time with his wife at his side. His hesitancy of being that exposed to another person, a nakedness of soul if you will, took some time to get over. I know I have boldness in private prayer that I would be hard pressed to reveal in the presence of another.

This boldness is present when I garden, too. The conversation is not a monologue either. I listen, or try to, for the whisper of insight.

I remember a time when that intimacy with God in my garden was about to change.

Three friends, volunteers from the gardening society at the retreat center, were coming to my gardens. They had become aware of my increasing physical limitations from an arthritic spine, and the loss of strength in my arms. I was grateful, humbled, humiliated, tearful, and awash with a whole lot of emotions. I was feeling exposed and opened to being judged by the state of my gardens. After all, I was the St. Francis Garden Society Coordinator and people had expectations of amazing landscape designs on the property of such a person. I was humbled that my prayers for help were answered, and so quickly, and surprised by the anxiety of what that answer involved.

I would have to let go of my hermetic tendencies and learn a way to be willing and accepting of others in my private life.  I would learn about receiving charity with the same joy in which I gave it. I had to disarm the shame I felt for being the one in need.

My friends came, they dug and cleared the mess in a dozen gardens. As they toiled in my yard I did what I could do, and made them fresh tomato soup from what was picked off the vines that grew among the weeds.

I worked hard too, to figure out how to manage the coexistence of anxiety and gratefulness that swirled in my heart. Answered prayers are sometimes disconcerting even while they are full of grace.

Image Pixabay.com, CCO, Creative Commons.

 

Flowers Symbolic of the Beatitudes for Catholic Gardens

.

Herbaceous plants and hardwoods hold meaning in Christian art. Throughout history flowers have been used to signify personal affections. In the language of flowers there can be more than one connotation for a plant, though usually it holds the same sentiment.

In my book, A Catholic Gardener’s Spiritual Almanac, I share with readers how plant symbolisms relate to our Catholic heritage. I also guide you in how to create spiritually centered gardens.

In the Beatitudes (Mt 5:3-11) we find a guide for our journey to a personal resurrection. There are many plants that can be grown in your garden that relate to the sentiments of the Beatitudes, here are just a few. You can create a garden themed to a specific Beatitude—using trees, shrubs, flowers and herbs symbolizing, let’s say, meekness—or incorporate into an exiting garden just a few plants representing those Bible versus.

You can find out more about plant symbolisms in my book, online, or at the library.

Blessed are the poor in spirit: those who recognize their need for God and his loving grace. They may be economically poor and rich in faith. Unattached to the things of this world, they seek the kingdom of heaven.

file0001405663451 carnationCarnation, poor heart

 

file4731340648180 parsley or corianderCoriander, hidden worth

 

 

 

Blessed are those who mourn: those who lament their present state and weep for their sins, and for the souls in purgatory. They will be comforted by God.

file0001186517680 zinnia and Divine MercyZinnia, thoughts of absent friends

file6971301019924 PansyPansy, clarity of thoughts

 

 

 

Blessed are the meek: those who are far from being week, they possess an inner strength to restrain anger and discouragement in the face of adversity. They will inherit the world to come.

file0001673080711 sweet woodruffSweet woodruff, humility

_MG_6856 fernsFerns, sincerity

 

 

 

Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness: those who choose, as their first priority, to live rightly according to God’s will. They will be satisfied by God with eternal rest.

file7651243141762 black eye susanBlack-eye Susan, justice

file7181279389027 poppyRed Poppy, consolation

 

 

 

Blessed are the merciful: they imitate God’s mercy by extending forgiveness to others. They are patient and understanding in bearing others’ faults, in being charitable and compassionate. They will receive God’s mercy in their final judgment.

file0001965829310 chamomileChamomile, patience

file0001389942275 ladys mantleLady’s Mantle, comforting

 

 

 

Blessed are the pure in heart: those who act with integrity in their thoughts, words, and deeds. They intentionally act to keep themselves undefiled by evil and lustful thoughts. They will be united with God, will see the Beatific Vision in eternity as the angels see him now.

file1011261996332 dillDill, powerful against evil

file0001484766303 lavenderLavender, devotion and virtue

 

 

 

Blessed are the peacemakers: those who strive to live in peace with others, and attempt to sow peace in their world through sharing the Gospels. And to share the Word is to be a child, a son of God.

PICT2587 irisIris, a message

DSCN1378 yarrowYarrow, everlasting love

 

 

 

 Blessed are those who are persecuted: those who are abused, slandered, and oppressed for being a public witness to Christianity. They are a target for hatred. Persecuted Christians will receive great rewards in heaven.

IMG_0752 bayBay Laurel, glory

file3021341154406 mossMoss, enduring devotion

 

 

( 2/25/15)

(All images courtesy of morguefile.com)

 

 

A Garden Dedicated to the Precious Blood of Jesus

The month of July is dedicated to the Precious Blood of Jesus and brings home for me, as few other dedications do, the reality of Jesus’ humanity.

I often draw back emotionally when I realize what he endured in offering his very body and blood for my salvation. My tender heart cannot endure the reality of his horrific passion and am often reduced to tears by it all when I try to meditate on this truth. For this reason I am averse to attending Stations of the Cross, and Our Lord understands—after all he formed my inmost being in the womb (Ps 130:13).

Earlier in June I wrote about plants for a Catholic garden dedicated to the Sacred and Immaculate Hearts. For July I’ve selected a few plants that would be symbolic for a garden dedicated to the Precious Blood of Jesus.

Blood Flower, Asclepias curassavica: a shrubby 2-3’ high tender perennial for the warmer climates, USDA Zone 9-11, and grown as an annual elsewhere. It is in the same family of Butterfly Weed and will attract hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. Its red-orange flowers, touched with yellow, grow on the terminus—ends of stalks. To have more blooms, pinch back the stems early-on to encourage branching (more stalks=more terminal ends=more flowering sites). It has a much longer flowering period than Butterfly Weed, blooming from mid-summer to October. This plant requires full sun, evenly moist soil, and will reseed readily (that means it can become weedy!).

Blood Root, Sanguinaria canadensis: a perennial wildflower native to Eastern and North America, in USDA Zones 3-8.  Lovely single palmate leaves with a bit of a blue-green tint that showcases a single 2”, 6-10 white petal flower in early spring (March-April). The flowers are nyctinastic, opening in the sun and closing at night. This plant grows best in evenly moist humus rich soil, in part to full shade; will form large colonies in woodland floors and along shady streams. The leaves will continue to grow until late summer when the plant goes dormant. All parts of the plant will ‘bleed’ a reddish-yellow sap if damaged.

Love Lies Bleeding, Amaranthus caudatus: a tender annual that looks amazing cascading over walls, and is often grown in hanging baskets. It has long lasting 12” red ‘tails’ of tiny blooms, called panicles. It is drought tolerant—but not like a cactus!—growing best in full sun to light afternoon shade in hotter climates. Easy to grow in well drained soil, but roots will rot if overwatered and when stressed attract aphids. So yeah, a good plant for those challenged to be gardeners!

 

Bleeding Heart, Dicentra spectabilis (mentioned in June post and repeated here): Grow in moist, humusy soil in part shade. Beautiful in a border or woodland garden. Spring-early summer interest. Can take full sun in reliably moist soil. Protect from wind. Foliage generally goes dormant in summer’s heat, so be sure to choose companion plants so there isn’t an empty space left in the garden. USDA Zones 3-9.

Images:

Blood Flower: Image by Roland zh, upload on 27. September 2009 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Blood Root: Image by Spencer [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Love Lies Bleeding: Image by Wildfeuer [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], from Wikimedia Commons

Bleeding Heart: Image by Wildfeuer [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], from Wikimedia Commons